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I shouldn t look at other reviews on a book before writing my own, because they make me doubt myself For me, this is a 5 star book a book that I was engaged in, kept reading past my allotted reading time, thought about between reading sessions, thought about after I d finished the book and will happily recommend to others My only regret, that gave me any pause at all, was my feeling that the ending was a bit rushed But all the right stuff was there, so I m willing to forgive it.Okay, so on t I shouldn t look at other reviews on a book before writing my own, because they make me doubt myself For me, this is a 5 star book a book that I was engaged in, kept reading past my allotted reading time, thought about between reading sessions, thought about after I d finished the book and will happily recommend to others My only regret, that gave me any pause at all, was my feeling that the ending was a bit rushed But all the right stuff was there, so I m willing to forgive it.Okay, so on to what I thought I knew very little about the book when I first started reading, so it was a pleasant surprise to discover that Sam the main character in Scott s first book, Counting to D played a part I loved getting just a bit of an update on Sam s life and how she was doing beyond the ending of her story So that was a really nice treat.I enjoyed Emily s journey and how running was a theme used to show Emily s growth.As in her first book I loved Scott s easy use of smart stuff which is so often absent from YA books In this story Emily isn t the smartest one though she s no slouch , but biology and chemistry are used to connect with her autistic sister a way to bridge the gap between this socially awkward girl and the world around her This story deals with mental health, lifestyle choices, homosexuality, stereotyping You d think a book with all of that in it would be heavy handed but it totally isn t It was light and easy and yet managed to touch on these issues andwith a kind of depth that seems improbable Kate Scott has a deft hand at addressing many of the issues facing teens today, doing it in such a way that feels easy and real She writes like a friend, someone you could trust your secrets with, someone you could trust your heart with Yep, I don t regret my 5 stars The Evolution of Emily is excellent If you re a human and like contemporary YA fiction, you should read it Sixteen year old Emily starts the story with a monumental step she jogs right into the nearest high school and asks for an application form behind her mother s back It s clear from beginning on that her family is not exactly ordinary her mother has major social phobia issues really, she s certifiable and Emily s younger sister, Olivia, is autistic But this isn t the story of how Emily gains courage to break free of her isolated, home schooled life This story covers the next step what rip Sixteen year old Emily starts the story with a monumental step she jogs right into the nearest high school and asks for an application form behind her mother s back It s clear from beginning on that her family is not exactly ordinary her mother has major social phobia issues really, she s certifiable and Emily s younger sister, Olivia, is autistic But this isn t the story of how Emily gains courage to break free of her isolated, home schooled life This story covers the next step what ripples her actions create and how she deals with them This is a heart warming, enjoyable story Emily s act of bravery immediately demands sympathy, and her loving personality doesn t let the reader go She forces herself to embrace a new life, but at the same time, is unsure how to really pull it through When things seem too much, she runs Literally This sudden, somewhat insane reaction gave a great twist to her otherwise pretty level headed personality It makes her realistic After all, who could lead such an insanely isolated life and come out completely normal The school scenes are well done, making it easy to get lost in Emily s world The dialogue is realistic and the other characters are likable There s a sweet romance and a lot of confusion, perfect for this age group Probably one of the most driving things about this story is the weaving in of people with different outlooks on life and or challenges Not only are Emily s mother and sister portrayed with different challenges, but the people Emily meets at school don t fit in the normal, perfect high school image Although I found this array of characters almost too colorful , the author manages to weave them together so that it never really feels like it goes over board Obviously, there s a lot of issues with acceptance, fitting in and learning to embrace ones self In other words, great themes for teens Summed up, this is an enjoyable read I can especially recommend it to teenage girls who like real life stories about high school with a nice dab of boys and first love thrown in I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review I was hoping for a smart story, with a character that, despite the issues in their life was moving forward, growing and learning Not having read Scott s earlier book, I was unfamiliar with her style and storytelling, and was surprisingly pleased with this gem of a book Emily is ostensibly a typical teen girl who has a series of issues that are becomingcommon in today s society an autistic sister, an agoraphobic mother and having to learn the social coping mechanisms that are so unfami I was hoping for a smart story, with a character that, despite the issues in their life was moving forward, growing and learning Not having read Scott s earlier book, I was unfamiliar with her style and storytelling, and was surprisingly pleased with this gem of a book Emily is ostensibly a typical teen girl who has a series of issues that are becomingcommon in today s society an autistic sister, an agoraphobic mother and having to learn the social coping mechanisms that are so unfamiliar since she was in a homeschool environment If the social awkwardness isn t enough it s a new school with new people, and everything feels new and different Except her running the one thing that keeps her grounded And Emily is a runner first away from the cloistered and confining boundaries of home and to new options, opportunities and a perspective on life Full of smartly inserted insets that use biology and chemistry to make points and add depth, Scott has developed a wonderful character in Emily, giving her depth and showing her growth as she learns to navigate the world outside her home, and developing new ways to relate and navigate the difficulties at home The careful portrayal of her mother and sister add heart and a sense of honesty to both the emotional toll and the frustrations, from all sides Learning and dealing with the social scene at school is wonderfully detailed, and gives an opportunity for the author to add in some fairly deep issues that are handled with care neither becoming heavy handed and preachy, nor passing them off as unimportant From mental health to lifestyle choices, homosexuality and stereotyping, Scott touches on each issue with care, giving readers the opportunity to learn and understand , while leaving them without judgment from the story of the right or wrong Readers can learn, empathize, experience and start to understand the depth and difficulties in someone else s life that may not be instantly apparent, and come out the richer for it My first opportunity to read this author and it is a story that I can t recommend highly enough While I did feel that there was a race to the end to wrap up several hanging threads, for the most part the text and pacing gave the characters plenty of time to develop and grow, with nice insets of friendship, learning and humor I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via Edelweiss for purpose of honest review I was not compensated for this review all conclusions are my own responsibility This was loooong overdue, and in my defense, um i have nothing to say to defend myself except um sopho year of uni was really hard, and so was fencing i suck Ok so I did part of the review on December 6th, and here it is.I kinda screamed when it ended More like a caw of whaaaaat, I m done.Dang I read it on my mac, started in school before the pharmacy lecture and continued all the way in the train ride home where it ended, so that was a fast read But hey, I miss having that This was loooong overdue, and in my defense, um i have nothing to say to defend myself except um sopho year of uni was really hard, and so was fencing i suck Ok so I did part of the review on December 6th, and here it is.I kinda screamed when it ended More like a caw of whaaaaat, I m done.Dang I read it on my mac, started in school before the pharmacy lecture and continued all the way in the train ride home where it ended, so that was a fast read But hey, I miss having that funny feeling in your tummy when you read something so utterly poignant Been reading a lot of romance novels, so it was nice to feel something while reading hah Having read the first book, I was expecting some sort of secret to pop out idk why I m saying this I don t even remember if there was a secret in the first book, I think there wasn t.But hey, I like blake I want to hear his songs Not that familiar with autistic themes, but the ones brought up in the book are not really something totally new, but I did learn a few new things.The mother is interesting, and I could see how her actions would make sense And having the father to help mediate is good, so was the psychiatrist And so is Emily The way that Emily belongs in this dysfunctional family is interesting she s as much a part of it as she is apart of it.Tristan and Miles are likeable characters So was Sophie I appreciated the effort in trying to break down typical american high school stereotypes, but why is it even needed in the first place Like, I don t get the mention of the hierarchy again and again in YA books.So my epiphany then was the whole DO good wholesome perfect families exist.I ve been wondering about that ever since I read a book about a seemingly perfect family forgot the title , and the conversations I ve had about this goes almost as circular as the ones I ve had on true knowledge is what we know even concrete which is beside the point Basically, I really, really, really enjoyed reading the book.Maybe that s why it felt like it ended too fast or maybe it was the ending I REALLY WANTED TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED WHEN OLIVIA CAME IN I WAS SO ANGRY WHEN IT JUST ENDED.Broke my heart, it did.Even her first day would have been a sweet treat.Sigh Another great coming of age and coming to terms with your life story from Kate Scott, author of Counting to D.16 year old Emily makes the momentous decision to defy her agoraphobic mother and attend the local high school Once she gets there she discovers that none of her mother s fears are real no mean cheerleader or obnoxious jock stereotypes in this school Instead, Kate Scott creates a school full of real people who have many aspects to their personalities The smartest girl in the school c Another great coming of age and coming to terms with your life story from Kate Scott, author of Counting to D.16 year old Emily makes the momentous decision to defy her agoraphobic mother and attend the local high school Once she gets there she discovers that none of her mother s fears are real no mean cheerleader or obnoxious jock stereotypes in this school Instead, Kate Scott creates a school full of real people who have many aspects to their personalities The smartest girl in the school can t read The perky cheerleader really is nice, and would love some help with her science class Emily discovers that although people are friendly, she has no idea how to make a friend or how to be a friend Some slightly mature activity makes this book a high school pick Another great coming of age and coming to terms with your life story from Kate Scott, author of Counting to D.16 year old Emily makes the momentous decision to defy her agoraphobic mother and attend the local high school Once she gets there she discovers that none of her mother s fears are real no mean cheerleaders or obnoxious jocks in this school Instead, Kate Scott creates a school full of real people, people who have many aspects to their personalities The smartest girl in the school can Another great coming of age and coming to terms with your life story from Kate Scott, author of Counting to D.16 year old Emily makes the momentous decision to defy her agoraphobic mother and attend the local high school Once she gets there she discovers that none of her mother s fears are real no mean cheerleaders or obnoxious jocks in this school Instead, Kate Scott creates a school full of real people, people who have many aspects to their personalities The smartest girl in the school can t read The perky cheerleader really is nice, and would love some help with her science class Emily discovers that although people are friendly, she has no idea how to make a friend or how to be a friend Some slightly mature activity makes this book a high school pick This review is based on an ARC provided to me by the author Just within the first chapter I m already loving Emily and her want forI can tell she s a brave lady It feels good to read about a quiet main character There isn t many of them in YA fiction Her writing style is reflected I felt as though that Olivia was the main character, as well And how could I forget Sam from the first book It was great to be able to catch up with her on her life after the book. *DOWNLOAD E-PUB ⇦ The Evolution of Emily ⇢ Emily Charles knows how to run away Away from her overprotective, agoraphobic mother Away from her biology obsessed, autistic sister Away from her quiet sheltered claustrophobic homeschooled life When Emily s escape plan involves starting her junior year at Kennedy High School, she realizes she s no longer running away Now she s running towards Towards her quiet thoughtful cross country teammate, August Towards her zany enthusiastic lab partner, Miles Towards friendship, love, independence, and lifeThanks to her sister s special interest in biology, Emily knows all about the birds and the bees Boys are a lot confusing Readers who enjoyed Counting to D won t want to miss Scott s second novel, also set at Kennedy High School الأخلاق والسير agoraphobic mother Away from her biology obsessed Hate Me Today autistic sister Away from her quiet sheltered claustrophobic homeschooled life When Emily s escape plan involves starting her junior year at Kennedy High School Hostage to Pleasure she realizes she s no longer running away Now she s running towards Towards her quiet thoughtful cross country teammate A Sister to Scheherazade August Towards her zany enthusiastic lab partner Seven Psychics Miles Towards friendship Physical Chess: My Life in Catch-As-Catch-Can Wrestling love The Night My Bum Dropped: A Gleefully Exaggerated Memoir independence Freed from Witchcraft and lifeThanks to her sister s special interest in biology This Side of Paradise Emily knows all about the birds and the bees Boys are a lot confusing Readers who enjoyed Counting to D won t want to miss Scott s second novel The Sleeping Tiger also set at Kennedy High School Kate Scott is back at Kennedy High withcharacters for you to fall in love with and many familiar ones from her debut COUNTING TO D I liked this book even better than the first, and found Emily s struggle incredibly relatable Kate s use of Emily s love for running as a metaphor for her tendency for running away from difficulties weaves through the book and pulls it together into a book that is fun to read, yet also tackles some deep issues. The Evolution of Emily has a protagonist who has a lot on her plate an overprotective mother who believes in homeschooling, an autistic sister, and a world of friends and cute boys at her new school I liked the metaphor of her as a runner, not just in exercising, but as a person running towards independence and a new life This is the type of writing that feels light but has deep issues Emily is a character to root for and I enjoyed being in her world for a few hours.